The Etiquette of FLOSSING!

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Flossing is an essential part of dental hygiene and you should try to do it every day. It’s commonly know that flossing, in addition to tooth brushing, can reduce the chance of getting gingivitis compared to tooth brushing alone. We recommend that you floss prior to brushing to clean out the spacing between your teeth and help the fluoride from the toothpaste coat the entire tooth. Working it into your nightly routine is a good idea, preventing the bacterium from sitting on your teeth all night.
But as we all know, there are times when we just need to floss and we’re not in an ideal situation to start picking at our teeth in public. Can’t it make you crazy sometimes. Has this happened to you? You begin working your tongue, trying to wedge it between your teeth, and voila, sometimes it works. But sometimes it doesn’t and your tongue muscles start to get sore.

In an ideal world:

• Your teeth would be perfect and you wouldn’t need floss, or for that matter a dentist.
• If you had to floss, your hands would be smaller to fit better in your mouth to move the string back and forth.
• If you had to floss, your tongue would be better designed to do the job- slip between your teeth and move it in and out to get to the irritant?
• Restaurants would pass out floss at the end of a meal instead of having toothpicks at the door. If everyone was doing it in public than it would be more accepted.
But in the real world, there are more subtle options you can use to get the food out of your teeth in public. You can try interdental brushes or dental wands as an alternate to floss. If you need to do it in public it looks less awkward. Many go the restroom after each meal and floss, but that takes proactive thinking and a willingness to carry your floss everywhere you go.

The bottom line is to maintain a healthy mouth flossing should be a daily event. Whether you choose to do it in public it’s your business.

Google Author Cynthia Schick

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